The Story of Urashima Taro, the Fisher Lad

Long, long ago in the province of Tango there lived on the shore of Japan in the little fishing village of Mizu-no-ye a young
fisherman named Urashima Taro. His father had been a fisherman before him, and his skill had more than doubly descended
to his son, for Urashima was the most skillful fisher in all that country side, and could catch more Bonito and Tai in a day than
his comrades could in a week.

But in the little fishing village, more than for being a clever fisher of the sea was he known for his kind heart. In his whole life
he had never hurt anything, either great or small, and when a boy, his companions had always laughed at him, for he would
never join with them in teasing animals, but always tried to keep them from this cruel sport.

One soft summer twilight he was going home at the end of a day's fishing when he came upon a group of children. They were
all screaming and talking at the tops of their voices, and seemed to be in a state of great excitement about something, and on
his going up to them to see what was the matter he saw that they were tormenting a tortoise. First one boy pulled it this way,
then another boy pulled it that way, while a third child beat it with a stick, and the fourth hammered its shell with a stone.

Now Urashima felt very sorry for the poor tortoise and made up his mind to rescue it. He spoke to the boys:

"Look here, boys, you are treating that poor tortoise so badly that it will soon die!"

The boys, who were all of an age when children seem to delight in being cruel to animals, took no notice of Urashima's gentle
reproof, but went on teasing it as before. One of the older boys answered:

"Who cares whether it lives or dies? We do not. Here, boys, go on, go on!"

And they began to treat the poor tortoise more cruelly than ever. Urashima waited a moment, turning over in his mind what
would be the best way to deal with the boys. He would try to persuade them to give the tortoise up to him, so he smiled at
them and said:

"I am sure you are all good, kind boys! Now won't you give me the tortoise? I should like to have it so much!"

"No, we won't give you the tortoise," said one of the boys. "Why should we? We caught it ourselves."

"What you say is true," said Urashima, "but I do not ask you to give it to me for nothing. I will give you some money for it--in
other words, the Ojisan (Uncle) will buy it of you. Won't that do for you, my boys?" He held up the money to them, strung on a
piece of string through a hole in the center of each coin. "Look, boys, you can buy anything you like with this money. You can
do much more with this money than you can with that poor tortoise. See what good boys you are to listen to me."

The boys were not bad boys at all, they were only mischievous, and as Urashima spoke they were won by his kind smile and
gentle words and began "to be of his spirit," as they say in Japan. Gradually they all came up to him, the ringleader of the little
band holding out the tortoise to him.

"Very well, Ojisan, we will give you the tortoise if you will give us the money!" And Urashima took the tortoise and gave the
money to the boys, who, calling to each other, scampered away and were soon out of sight.

Then Urashima stroked the tortoise's back, saying as he did so:

"Oh, you poor thing! Poor thing!--there, there! you are safe now! They say that a stork lives for a thousand years, but the
tortoise for ten thousand years. You have the longest life of any creature in this world, and you were in great danger of
having that precious life cut short by those cruel boys. Luckily I was passing by and saved you, and so life is still yours. Now I
am going to take you back to your home, the sea, at once. Do not let yourself be caught again, for there might be no one to
save you next time!"

All the time that the kind fisherman was speaking he was walking quickly to the shore and out upon the rocks; then putting the
tortoise into the water he watched the animal disappear, and turned homewards himself, for he was tired and the sun had set.

The next morning Urashima went out as usual in his boat. The weather was fine and the sea and sky were both blue and soft
in the tender haze of the summer morning. Urashima got into his boat and dreamily pushed out to sea, throwing his line as he
did so. He soon passed the other fishing boats and left them behind him till they were lost to sight in the distance, and his
boat drifted further and further out upon the blue waters. Somehow, he knew not why, he felt unusually happy that morning;
and he could not help wishing that, like the tortoise he set free the day before, he had thousands of years to live instead of
his own short span of human life.

He was suddenly startled from his reverie by hearing his own name called:

"Urashima, Urashima!"

Clear as a bell and soft as the summer wind the name floated over the sea.

He stood up and looked in every direction, thinking that one of the other boats had overtaken him, but gaze as he might over
the wide expanse of water, near or far there was no sign of a boat, so the voice could not have come from any human being.

Startled, and wondering who or what it was that had called him so clearly, he looked in all directions round about him and saw
that without his knowing it a tortoise had come to the side of the boat. Urashima saw with surprise that it was the very tortoise
he had rescued the day before.

"Well, Mr. Tortoise," said Urashima, "was it you who called my name just now?"

The tortoise nodded its head several times and said:

"Yes, it was I. Yesterday in your honorable shadow (o kage sama de) my life was saved, and I have come to offer you my
thanks and to tell you how grateful I am for your kindness to me."

"Indeed," said Urashima, "that is very polite of you. Come up into the boat. I would offer you a smoke, but as you are a tortoise
doubtless you do not smoke," and the fisherman laughed at the joke.

"He-he-he-he!" laughed the tortoise; "sake (rice wine) is my favorite refreshment, but I do not care for tobacco."

"Indeed," said Urashima, "I regret very much that I have no "sake" in my boat to offer you, but come up and dry your back in
the sun-- tortoises always love to do that."

So the tortoise climbed into the boat, the fisherman helping him, and after an exchange of complimentary speeches the
tortoise said:

"Have you ever seen Rin Gin, the Palace of the Dragon King of the Sea, Urashima?"

The fisherman shook his head and replied; "No; year after year the sea has been my home, but though I have often heard of
the Dragon King's realm under the sea I have never yet set eyes on that wonderful place. It must be very far away, if it exists
at all!"

"Is that really so? You have never seen the Sea King's Palace? Then you have missed seeing one of the most wonderful
sights in the whole universe. It is far away at the bottom of the sea, but if I take you there we shall soon reach the place. If you
would like to see the Sea King's land I will be your guide."

"I should like to go there, certainly, and you are very kind to think of taking me, but you must remember that I am only a poor
mortal and have not the power of swimming like a sea creature such as you are--"

Before the fisherman could say more the tortoise stopped him, saying:

"What? You need not swim yourself. If you will ride on my back I will take you without any trouble on your part."

"But," said Urashima, "how is it possible for me to ride on your small back?"

"It may seem absurd to you. but I assure you that you can do so. Try at once! Just come and get on my back, and see if it is
as impossible as you think!"

As the tortoise finished speaking, Urashima looked at its shell, and strange to say be saw that the creature had suddenly
grown so big that a man could easily sit on its back.

"This is strange indeed!" said Urashima; "then. Mr. Tortoise, with your kind permission I will get on your back. Dokoisho!"
[Footnote: "All right" (only used by lower classes).] he exclaimed as he jumped on.

The tortoise, with an unmoved face, as if this strange proceeding were quite an ordinary event, said:

"Now we will set out at our leisure," and with these words he leapt into the sea with Urashima on his back. Down through the
water the tortoise dived. For a long time these two strange companions rode through the sea. Urashima never grew tired, nor
his clothes moist with the water. At last, far away in the distance a magnificent gate appeared, and behind the gate, the long,
sloping roofs of a palace on the horizon.

"Ya." exclaimed Urashima. "that looks like the gate of some large palace just appearing! Mr. Tortoise, can you tell what that
place is we can now see?"

"That is the great gate of the Rin Gin Palace, the large roof that you see behind the gate is the Sea King's Palace itself."

"Then we have at last come to the realm of the Sea King and to his Palace," said Urashima.

"Yes, indeed," answered the tortoise, "and don't you think we have come very quickly?" And while he was speaking the
tortoise reached the side of the gate. "And here we are, and you must please walk from here."

The tortoise now went in front, and speaking to the gatekeeper, said:

"This is Urashima Taro, from the country of Japan. I have had the honor of bringing him as a visitor to this kingdom. Please
show him the way."

Then the gatekeeper, who was a fish, at once led the way through the gate before them.

The red bream, the flounder, the sole, the cuttlefish, and all the chief vassals of the Dragon King of the Sea now came out
with courtly bows to welcome the stranger.

"Urashima Sama, Urashima Sama! welcome to the Sea Palace, the home of the Dragon King of the Sea. Thrice welcome are
you, having come from such a distant country. And you, Mr. Tortoise, we are greatly indebted to you for all your trouble in
bringing Urashima here." Then, turning again to Urashima, they said, "Please follow us this way," and from here the whole
band of fishes became his guides.

Urashima, being only a poor fisher lad, did not know how to behave in a palace; but, strange though it was all to him, he did
not feel ashamed or embarrassed, but followed his kind guides quite calmly where they led to the inner palace. When he
reached the portals a beautiful Princess with her attendant maidens came out to welcome him. She was more beautiful than
any human being, and was robed in flowing garments of red and soft green like the under side of a wave, and golden threads
glimmered through the folds of her gown. Her lovely black hair streamed over her shoulders in the fashion of a king's
daughter many hundreds of years ago, and when she spoke her voice sounded like music over the water. Urashima was lost
in wonder while he looked upon her, and he could not speak. Then he remembered that he ought to bow, but before he could
make a low obeisance the Princess took him by the hand and led him to a beautiful hall, and to the seat of honor at the upper
end, and bade him be seated.

"Urashima Taro, it gives me the highest pleasure to welcome you to my father's kingdom," said the Princess. "Yesterday you
set free a tortoise, and I have sent for you to thank you for saving my life, for I was that tortoise. Now if you like you shall live
here forever in the land of eternal youth, where summer never dies and where sorrow never comes, and I will be your bride if
you will, and we will live together happily forever afterwards!"

And as Urashima listened to her sweet words and gazed upon her lovely face his heart was filled with a great wonder and joy,
and he answered her, wondering if it was not all a dream:

"Thank you a thousand times for your kind speech. There is nothing I could wish for more than to be permitted to stay here
with you in this beautiful land, of which I have often heard, but have never seen to this day. Beyond all words, this is the most
wonderful place I have ever seen."

While he was speaking a train of fishes appeared, all dressed in ceremonial, trailing garments. One by one, silently and with
stately steps, they entered the hall, bearing on coral trays delicacies of fish and seaweed, such as no one can dream of, and
this wondrous feast was set before the bride and bridegroom. The bridal was celebrated with dazzling splendor, and in the
Sea King's realm there was great rejoicing. As soon as the young pair had pledged themselves in the wedding cup of wine,
three times three, music was played, and songs were sung, and fishes with silver scales and golden tails stepped in from the
waves and danced. Urashima enjoyed himself with all his heart. Never in his whole life had he sat down to such a marvelous
feast.

When the feast was over the Princes asked the bridegroom if he would like to walk through the palace and see all there was
to be seen. Then the happy fisherman, following his bride, the Sea King's daughter, was shown all the wonders of that
enchanted land where youth and joy go hand in hand and neither time nor age can touch them. The palace was built of coral
and adorned with pearls, and the beauties and wonders of the place were so great that the tongue fails to describe them.

But, to Urashima, more wonderful than the palace was the garden that surrounded it. Here was to be seen at one time the
scenery of the four different seasons; the beauties of summer and winter, spring and autumn, were displayed to the
wondering visitor at once.

First, when he looked to the east, the plum and cherry trees were seen in full bloom, the nightingales sang in the pink
avenues, and butterflies flitted from flower to flower.

Looking to the south all the trees were green in the fullness of summer, and the day cicala and the night cricket chirruped
loudly.

Looking to the west the autumn maples were ablaze like a sunset sky, and the chrysanthemums were in perfection.

Looking to the north the change made Urashima start, for the ground was silver white with snow, and trees and bamboos were
also covered with snow and the pond was thick with ice.

And each day there were new joys and new wonders for Urashima, and so great was his happiness that he forgot everything,
even the home he had left behind and his parents and his own country, and three days passed without his even thinking of all
he had left behind. Then his mind came back to him and he remembered who he was, and that he did not belong to this
wonderful land or the Sea King's palace, and he said to himself:

"O dear! I must not stay on here, for I have an old father and mother at home. What can have happened to them all this time?
How anxious they must have been these days when I did not return as usual. I must go back at once without letting one more
day pass." And he began to prepare for the journey in great haste.

Then he went to his beautiful wife, the Princess, and bowing low before her he said:

"Indeed, I have been very happy with you for a long time, Otohime Sama" (for that was her name), "and you have been kinder
to me than any words can tell. But now I must say good-by. I must go back to my old parents."

Then Otohime Sama began to weep, and said softly and sadly:

"Is it not well with you here, Urashima, that you wish to leave me so soon? Where is the haste? Stay with me yet another day
only!"

But Urashima had remembered his old parents, and in Japan the duty to parents is stronger than everything else, stronger
even than pleasure or love, and he would not be persuaded, but answered:

"Indeed, I must go. Do not think that I wish to leave you. It is not that. I must go and see my old parents. Let me go for one day
and I will come back to you."

"Then," said the Princess sorrowfully, "there is nothing to be done. I will send you back to-day to your father and mother, and
instead of trying to keep you with me one more day, I shall give you this as a token of our love--please take it back with you;"
and she brought him a beautiful lacquer box tied about with a silken cord and tassels of red silk.

Urashima had received so much from the Princess already that he felt some compunction in taking the gift, and said:

"It does not seem right for me to take yet another gift from you after all the many favors I have received at your hands, but
because it is your wish I will do so," and then he added:

"Tell me what is this box?"

"That," answered the Princess "is the tamate-bako (Box of the Jewel Hand), and it contains something very precious. You
must not open this box, whatever happens! If you open it something dreadful will happen to you! Now promise me that you will
never open this box!"

And Urashima promised that he would never, never open the box whatever happened.

Then bidding good-by to Otohime Sama he went down to the seashore, the Princess and her attendants following him, and
there he found a large tortoise waiting for him.

He quickly mounted the creature's back and was carried away over the shining sea into the East. He looked back to wave his
hand to Otohime Sama till at last he could see her no more, and the land of the Sea King and the roofs of the wonderful
palace were lost in the far, far distance. Then, with his face turned eagerly towards his own land, he looked for the rising of
the blue hills on the horizon before him.

At last the tortoise carried him into the bay he knew so well, and to the shore from whence he had set out. He stepped on to
the shore and looked about him while the tortoise rode away back to the Sea King's realm.

But what is the strange fear that seizes Urashima as he stands and looks about him? Why does he gaze so fixedly at the
people that pass him by, and why do they in turn stand and look at him? The shore is the same and the hills are the same,
but the people that he sees walking past him have very different faces to those he had known so well before.

Wondering what it can mean he walks quickly towards his old home. Even that looks different, but a house stands on the spot,
and he calls out:

"Father, I have just returned!" and he was about to enter, when he saw a strange man coming out.

"Perhaps my parents have moved while I have been away, and have gone somewhere else," was the fisherman's thought.
Somehow he began to feel strangely anxious, he could not tell why.

"Excuse me," said he to the man who was staring at him, "but till within the last few days I have lived in this house. My name is
Urashima Taro. Where have my parents gone whom I left here?"

A very bewildered expression came over the face of the man, and, still gazing intently on Urashima's face, he said:

"What? Are you Urashima Taro?"

"Yes," said the fisherman, "I am Urashima Taro!"

"Ha, ha!" laughed the man, "you must not make such jokes. It is true that once upon a time a man called Urashima Taro did
live in this village, but that is a story three hundred years old. He could not possibly be alive now!"

When Urashima heard these strange words he was frightened, and said:

"Please, please, you must not joke with me, I am greatly perplexed. I am really Urashima Taro, and I certainly have not lived
three hundred years. Till four or five days ago I lived on this spot. Tell me what I want to know without more joking, please."

But the man's face grew more and more grave, and he answered:

"You may or may not be Urashima Taro, I don't know. But the Urashima Taro of whom I have heard is a man who lived three
hundred years ago. Perhaps you are his spirit come to revisit your old home?"

"Why do you mock me?" said Urashima. "I am no spirit! I am a living man--do you not see my feet;" and "don-don," he
stamped on the ground, first with one foot and then with the other to show the man. (Japanese ghosts have no feet.)

"But Urashima Taro lived three hundred years ago, that is all I know; it is written in the village chronicles, "persisted the man,
who could not believe what the fisherman said.

Urashima was lost in bewilderment and trouble. He stood looking all around him, terribly puzzled, and, indeed, something in
the appearance of everything was different to what he remembered before he went away, and the awful feeling came over him
that what the man said was perhaps true. He seemed to be in a strange dream. The few days he had spent in the Sea King's
palace beyond the sea had not been days at all: they had been hundreds of years, and in that time his parents had died and
all the people he had ever known, and the village had written down his story. There was no use in staying here any longer. He
must get back to his beautiful wife beyond the sea.

He made his way back to the beach, carrying in his hand the box which the Princess had given him. But which was the way?
He could not find it alone! Suddenly he remembered the box, the tamate-bako.

"The Princess told me when she gave me the box never to open it-- that it contained a very precious thing. But now that I
have no home, now that I have lost everything that was dear to me here, and my heart grows thin with sadness, at such a
time, if I open the box, surely I shall find something that will help me, something that will show me the way back to my beautiful
Princess over the sea. There is nothing else for me to do now. Yes, yes, I will open the box and look in!"

And so his heart consented to this act of disobedience, and he tried to persuade himself that he was doing the right thing in
breaking his promise.

Slowly, very slowly, he untied the red silk cord, slowly and wonderingly he lifted the lid of the precious box. And what did he
find? Strange to say only a beautiful little purple cloud rose out of the box in three soft wisps. For an instant it covered his
face and wavered over him as if loath to go, and then it floated away like vapor over the sea.

Urashima, who had been till that moment like a strong and handsome youth of twenty-four, suddenly became very, very old.
His back doubled up with age, his hair turned snowy white, his face wrinkled and he fell down dead on the beach.

Poor Urashima! because of his disobedience he could never return to the Sea King's realm or the lovely Princess beyond the
sea.

Little children, never be disobedient to those who are wiser than you for disobedience was the beginning of all the miseries
and sorrows of life.


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